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Harrison Howe

Playgroup for your Kids | Daphyl's Iconic Baby Gear
Editor's Note: Harrison Howe is a freelance content provider & writer for Daphyl's LLC. Daphyl's is a USA based multi-national world leader in safe, innovative, Licensed Rock N Roll, branded baby gear. The opinions, advice and assertions made in this article are for entertainment and information purposes only & are solely those of the author.

What to Look For in a Playgroup

By | Parenting

If you’re a stay-at-home mom or dad, then maybe you aren’t doing the pre-school route. However, it’s important to arrange some play time for your child with others his/her age.

Enter the playgroup.

Playgroups are far less structured than pre-school, but still provide an organized and supervised get-together that allows your child to engage with other children and form important social and creative skills and learn how to make friends, share and be involved in a group setting.

Really, how else is Jason or Jessica going to learn how to share their new toys? Or how will they learn how to react when someone tries to take their cool Pink Floyd or Beatles sippy cup?

In many cases, there’s more to it than just getting some neighborhood kids together. Is a specific playgroup right for you and your child? What should you consider when you’re looking to hook up with that perfect playgroup for your toddler?

Here are some things you might look for when you’re on the search for a playgroup.

Playgroup for your Kids | Daphyl's Iconic Baby Gear

The Importance of a Playgroup

Before we explore what you might look for in a playgroup, let’s take a moment to find out why it’s a good idea for your child to attend one in the first place.

There’s only so much time you as a busy mom or dad can spend with your child. Yes, you’re giving them play time, and structure, and setting rules. But when your child can be around others their age to help them develop communication skills and the ability to share and try new things, then you should take advantage of such an opportunity.

A 2016 report from the Australian Institute of Family Studies showed that participation in a playgroup benefited children in areas of self-confidence, speech and increased engagement in play. The report goes on to show that yes, even moms and dads benefit: improvement to their social lives, a better relationship with their child and more confidence in providing care to their children are listed among the parental benefits of playgroups.

Is This Playgroup Right for Me?

Age. Facilities. Structure. Even distance. These are a few of the major aspects you should consider when you’re planning to try on a playgroup for size.

In many cases, it’s important to think about the range of ages you want your child to interact with. If he/she is crawling, putting them in a room of 3- and 4-year olds might not be beneficial and maybe even dangerous. Up to the age of perhaps three, you might want to find a playgroup where all of the children are the same ages.

For those over three, they might learn from older children, so going for a playgroup with a more diverse age range might be the way to go.

What is the facility like? Is the setting conducive for children under the age of three? Is there enough around to keep a five-year-old entertained? Visit the location and see what age group it’s geared toward and if the surroundings are safe and offer activities and toys that match your child’s interests and age.

Are you looking for a lot of structure or more informal meetings? Your child’s personality might mesh best with an informal group run by a parent or parents, while another’s might benefit from one run by an early childhood educator and has a more formal structure.

This aspect will mostly depend on what you hope to get out of a playgroup. If you’re looking to just have your child build some interactive skills and friendships, an informal playgroup might be great. If you want your child to learn more of the skills they might develop in pre-school, then formal might be the way to go. And some might combine the best of both. Whatever works best for you.

Of course, distance needs to be considered. Is the playgroup you found ideal in every way but too far from your home? You’ll need to think about this in cases where your child falls ill during his time at the group and you need to get to him in a hurry.

In the end, it will take some research, but when you find the right playgroup, you’ll know it. Your child will know it. And the benefits you’ll both enjoy: priceless.

Editor’s Note: Harrison Howe is a freelance content provider & writer for Daphyl’s LLC. Daphyl’s is a USA based multi-national world leader in safe, innovative, Licensed Rock N Roll, branded baby gear. The opinions, advice and assertions made in this article are for entertainment and information purposes only & are solely those of the author.

Editor's Note: Harrison Howe is a freelance content provider & writer for Daphyl's LLC. Daphyl's is a USA based multi-national world leader in safe, innovative, Licensed Rock N Roll, branded baby gear. The opinions, advice and assertions made in this article are for entertainment and information purposes only & are solely those of the author.

Putting Your Foot Down: How to Say No to Your Child

By | Parenting

Say No to Your Children | Daphyl's Iconic Baby Gear

“No.”

Who knew such a small word could turn the world upside down?

Yes, no is NO fun to hear. As far as your child is concerned, this is the worst word in the English language. Children just don’t like to be told no; the utterance of this word can cause tantrums, screaming, crying, or other unacceptable behaviors, even in public. They’ll beg. Plead. Try to negotiate. Even try to manipulate you into getting their way.

But there will be times when no is the answer. So how can you tell your child no in a way that they can accept and that could help avoid the undesirable response they might have to the word?

Believe it or not, there are ways to do it!

Know How to Say No

So your two-year old holds up her sippy cup and wants more juice. But it’s close to dinner time and she’s already had enough, you feel. Time to say no.

You might avoid the inevitable tantrum by having set some limits earlier. For instance, you might have explained that only one cup of juice is allowed before dinner. Then, when they ask for more, you can simply remind them that the limit was already set. “No, honey…only one cup before dinner. Remember?”

You could almost make it sound as if you’re agreeing with your child, but still say no. You might say, “Sure, you can have more juice…but you have to eat your dinner first.” That’s no without saying no, directly. Sneaky, huh? But it just might work in some cases. If your child feels there’s a payoff for doing what they’re told, they might just roll with it.

Be understanding. You could try, “I know you want more juice, but you can’t right now. You might spoil your appetite and you need to eat to grow up big and strong. After dinner you can have more juice.” You’re being supportive, you’re not yelling, and you’re offering an explanation. It’s worth a shot–some kids will really respond to this, rather than the abrupt, cold “No.”

Saying ‘No’ is GOOD for Your Child

One way to make it easier on YOU to say No to your child is to understand that by doing so, you’re raising your child to be more accepting and responsible.

A child who gets what he/she wants at all times simply grows into an adult how can be demanding, easily frustrated, and unable to deal with disappointment.

No needs to be a word they hear from a young age, says Dr. Susan Bartell, a nationally-recognized psychologist and author. “This should start when kids are very young…ages 1 or 2. When you say no to your kids at that age, you’re teaching them the skill of self-soothing…you are teaching them self-control.”

Dr. Bartell goes on to say, “They won’t have temper tantrums because you will have taught them how to hear it. Remember that when you say no you’re teaching three important skills: tolerating not getting what you want, respecting another person’s view, and managing your feelings.”

Those skills will go a long way as your child grows to adulthood. They WILL hear no: from teachers, bosses, even spouses. Having a healthy understanding and acceptance of this word will serve them well throughout their lives.

In sales, they say that you’re one “No” closer to a “Yes.” When it comes to raising your child, you’re one “No” closer to being a more effective and assertive parent.

Say No & go rock it!

Editor’s Note: Harrison Howe is a freelance content provider & writer for Daphyl’s LLC. Daphyl’s is a USA based multi-national world leader in safe, innovative, Licensed Rock N Roll, branded baby gear. The opinions, advice and assertions made in this article are for entertainment and information purposes only & are solely those of the author.

Behaving in Public | Well Behaved| Daphyl's
Editor's Note: Harrison Howe is a freelance content provider & writer for Daphyl's LLC. Daphyl's is a USA based multi-national world leader in safe, innovative, Licensed Rock N Roll, branded baby gear. The opinions, advice and assertions made in this article are for entertainment and information purposes only & are solely those of the author.

How to Keep Your Child Well-Behaved in Public

By | Parenting

Okay, we’ve all experienced it: the meltdown in the grocery store, the carrying-on at the family restaurant, the unacceptable behavior during church service.

No, you’re NOT a bad parent! Kids will be kids; they can often easily be bored, or distracted, or just unhappy about being in a certain place at a certain time. However, this doesn’t mean the behavior should be condoned. Screaming and crying and throwing a tantrum is simply NOT acceptable in most public settings.

So how do you assure that your child is well-behaved when out in public?

There’s no easy answer; what works for one child might not work for another, and in some cases you might have to try a few things, like rewards for good behavior, that can go a long way toward a well-mannered and agreeable child in the grocery store, restaurant, theater, or mall.

Here are some things you might try to help guarantee a more successful day out when you have young ones in tow.

How to Avoid a Day Out From Turning Into a Nightmare

Planning to run a few errands with your toddler? There are a few things you might do to help avoid meltdowns and tantrums and keep them well-behaved in public.

  • Make sure your child has eaten and gone potty before leaving the house. Some misbehaviors can be linked to being hungry or having to go to the bathroom
  • Bring a favorite toy or toys, books, or other items that can keep your child occupied while you’re out
  • Take a short trip if you sense your child is not up to a day out; for instance, if your child is already cranky before leaving home, it might not be in your–or her–best interest to hit the bank, grocery store, dry cleaner’s, gas station AND pharmacy in one trip

Also, rehearse good/bad behavior rewards and consequences on short trips. Go to the grocery store for only a few items and let your child experience the praise and/or the punishment for being an angel or making life difficult while you’re out. Once they know you mean business and that rewards await good behavior, they might be more apt to do the right thing when you’re running several errands.

Behaving in Public | Behave | Daphyl's Iconic Baby Gear

What To Do When the “Bad” Child Comes Out

Next time you’re out pushing your little one in his or her cool Daphyl’s stroller through the mall or grocery store and they’re screaming and crying because they’ve seen something they want that they can’t have, what do you do?

Reinforce the rules. Remind them that they promised to be well-behaved and follow those rules. If need be, head to a quiet corner at the back of the store or back out to the car until your child is calmed. Don’t raise your voice. Get down to your child’s level and speak gently.

Try to redirect their attention to something else. If you can get them to laugh, even better. It might feel like hours, but a tantrum can be over pretty quickly if handled the right way.

If all else fails, your day out just might have to be abandoned for a later date. This is where the consequences come in. No child enjoys being punished or reprimanded. A trip cut short might happen once or twice, but with consistency on your part when it comes to consequences, your child will quickly learn that unacceptable behavior in public will have an adverse effect on him or her.

Eventually, like everything else, you’ll master this, too. Because you rock, Mom (and Dad)!

Editor’s Note: Harrison Howe is a freelance content provider & writer for Daphyl’s LLC. Daphyl’s is a USA based multi-national world leader in safe, innovative, Licensed Rock N Roll, branded baby gear. The opinions, advice and assertions made in this article are for entertainment and information purposes only & are solely those of the author.

Boys & Girls | Daphyl's Iconic Baby Gear
Editor's Note: Harrison Howe is a freelance content provider & writer for Daphyl's LLC. Daphyl's is a USA based multi-national world leader in safe, innovative, Licensed Rock N Roll, branded baby gear. The opinions, advice and assertions made in this article are for entertainment and information purposes only & are solely those of the author.

All Boys? All Girls? The BEST Things About Both

By | Parenting

You’re expecting! Congratulations!

Wishing for a boy? Hoping for a girl? Those are questions you’ll be asked time and again during your pregnancy; most parents will truthfully answer that it doesn’t matter, as long as the baby is healthy.

Deep down, Dad might be hoping for a boy he can toss a football with and take hunting, while Mom is keeping fingers crossed behind her back for that little girl she can put in pretty dresses and spend days baking with.

But at the end of the day, yes, health trumps gender.

And you’ll enjoy them no matter what. Boys can help moms bake and girls can catch a football. No big deal.

There is the chance that you might have three or four or even more children, and they might all be of the same sex. And that’s okay. It might sound overwhelming and you might feel somewhat disappointed that you didn’t get to experience both worlds, but there’s lots to love about having all of the same gender when you have kids.

We’ll take a look at the BEST things about having all boys or all girls.

Snips and Snails and Puppy Dog Tails

Boy oh boy oh boy…it might not be easy, but raising all boys can be loads of FUN.

Maybe one of the best is that boys will be boys…even when they’re grown up. Honestly, boys just seem to stay little for a bit longer. There seems to be some innate pressure on girls to grow up more quickly. Your tween boy might still enjoy exploring in the woods or playing in the dirt as much as he did when he was younger. Enjoy those times as much as possible. You’ll miss them when they’re gone.

Boys Family | Daphyl's Iconic Baby Gear

A mother/son bond is strong. You’ll love it. Most never grow too big or too old not to need their mamas…or give them a hug.

Hand-me-downs! (Save lots of $$ on new clothes).

Long car trip and no rest stops in sight? Behind every tree along the highway is a rest stop when you have all boys!

Boys also tend to be more laid back. Need to be out the door in record time? No hair to fuss with or clothes to change several times—boys are just ‘go with the flow’!
All boys can also build healthy competition, a tolerance of rough-housing and maybe best: built-in playmates! If you’re stuck inside on a rainy day, boys might be content with toy trucks or dressing up as their favorite superhero and pretty much entertain themselves.

Oh, and let’s face it: boy toys are cool!

Sugar and Spice and All Things Nice

You already have three girls and really want this one–your last–to be a boy…but the doctor proudly proclaims, “It’s a girl!”

Though not without its challenges same as raising all boys, having an all-girl clan is great. First, little girls LOVE to be Mommy’s Little Helper. Cleaning the house? Your girls will love to dust and vacuum and straighten up. It might not be done perfectly, but so what? You can all have fun “playing house”.

Boy clothes are neat and cheaper, but what Mom doesn’t love to dress up little girls? You can spend days wandering stores shopping for girl clothes. Most girls will love it.

Grils | Daphyl's Iconic Baby Gear

Dads: it takes a special guy to raise a daughter. You’ll be the #1 man in her life. There’s no feeling like it. No imagine it multiplied by three or four. Bliss. And you get that special dance with each one at their weddings.

That maternal instinct girls have will come in handy when you need help with the newest addition. Your older girls will step up and be little mamas to their baby sister. It can be a huge help!

Daddy/daughter dances. Mom/daughter Girls’ Nights Out. All girls? You get to do these over and over and over. Cherish it.

So all boys? Or all girls? Life’s the BEST either way.

Editor’s Note: Harrison Howe is a freelance content provider & writer for Daphyl’s LLC. Daphyl’s is a USA based multi-national world leader in safe, innovative, Licensed Rock N Roll, branded baby gear. The opinions, advice and assertions made in this article are for entertainment and information purposes only & are solely those of the author.